Steven Weiner

Steven Weiner
  • Lecturer

Contact Information

Overview

Steven Weiner has three decades of experience advising companies and stakeholders on strategic decisions that require a deep understanding of IP law, advanced technology and business strategy. He holds degrees from Harvard Law School (JD), MIT (EE & CS, focusing on AI), and the University of Pennsylvania (BSE, Systems Science & Engineering). Steven’s specialties include IP strategy, patent analysis, R&D strategy, technology agreements, Internet law, and IP risk assessment and mitigation. He has particularly deep expertise in the domains of software, algorithms, AI, and digital media.

Steven has been fortunate to enjoy a satisfying career blend of senior in-house and private firm roles, including commercializing innovation for Penn Engineering; heading IP and strategic planning for R&D think-tank SRI International; leading the Corporate Intellectual Property practice at Davis Polk; directing software and media IP strategy for Silicon Graphics; and serving as an IP/patent litigator at Irell & Manell.

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Teaching

Past Courses

  • EAS5070 - Int Prop&Bus Law For Eng

    Engineers are often on the front line of innovation. The goal of this course is to introduce engineering students to the basics of Intellectual property (IP) and business laws that they will encounter throughout their careers. Understanding these laws is critical for the protection of IP and for the creation and success of high-tech start-up ventures. Market advantage in large part springs from a company's IP. Without legal protection and correct business formation, proprietary designs, processes, and inventions could be freely used by competitors, ruining market advantage. A basic understanding of IP laws, contractual transactions, employment agreements, business structures, and debt-equity financing will help engineering students to become effective employees or entrepreneurs, to acquire investors, and to achieve success. Though open to students of all disciplines, the course will use case studies particular relevance to students of engineering and applied science.

  • LGST7290 - Intel Property Strategy

    Announcing the first iPhone at Macworld 2007, Apple CEO Steve Jobs famously boasted: "And boy, have we patented it!" How, and to what extent, do patents and intellectual property really provide competitive advantage for innovative technology companies? What makes an IP asset strategically powerful? How do patents impact, and even drive, major corporate decisions including M&A, venture funding and exits, and entry into new markets? In this course, students will learn to critically analyze and answer these questions, gaining insights they can leverage in their future roles as innovation industry executives, entrepreneurs, strategist and investors. The course includes three major units. In Unit 1, Patents and Innovation Value, we examine closely the relationship between competitive advantage, value proposition, and intellectual property (particularly patents). We will apply our understanding of that relationship to critique and sharpen patent strategy to protect examples of cutting-edge technologies. In Unit 2, Patent Leverage and the Corporate Playbook, we study theory and examples of how intellectual property leverage strategically informs corporate transactions and decisions, for established companies as well as for start-ups. In unit 3, Limits and Alternatives to Patents, we confront the recent legal trend toward reigning in the power and scope of patents. We also consider the growing importance of data as a proprietary technology asset, and discuss options for adapting intellectual property strategy appropriately. Throughout, students will learn and practice applying the concepts we learn to decision-making in examples based on innovative real-world technologies and businesses.

  • MGMT2290 - Intel Property Strategy

    Announcing the first iPhone at Macworld 2007, Apple CEO Steve Jobs famously boasted: "And boy, have we patented it!" How, and to what extent, do patents and intellectual property really provide competitive advantage for innovative technology companies? What makes an IP asset strategically powerful? How do patents impact, and even drive, major corporate decisions including M&A, venture funding and exits, and entry into new markets? In this course, students will learn to critically analyze and answer these questions, gaining insights they can leverage in their future roles as innovation industry executives, entrepreneurs, strategist and investors. The course includes three major units. In Unit 1, Patents and Innovation Value, we examine closely the relationship between competitive advantage, value proposition, and intellectual property (particularly patents). We will apply our understanding of that relationship to critique and sharpen patent strategy to protect examples of cutting-edge technologies. In Unit 2, Patent Leverage and the Corporate Playbook, we study theory and examples of how intellectual property leverage strategically informs corporate transactions and decisions, for established companies as well as for start-ups. In unit 3, Limits and Alternatives to Patents, we confront the recent legal trend toward reigning in the power and scope of patents. We also consider the growing importance of data as a proprietary technology asset, and discuss options for adapting intellectual property strategy appropriately. Throughout, students will learn and practice applying the concepts we learn to decision-making in examples based on innovative real-world technologies and businesses.

  • MGMT7290 - Intel Property Strategy

    Announcing the first iPhone at Macworld 2007, Apple CEO Steve Jobs famously boasted: "And boy, have we patented it!" How, and to what extent, do patents and intellectual property really provide competitive advantage for innovative technology companies? What makes an IP asset strategically powerful? How do patents impact, and even drive, major corporate decisions including M&A, venture funding and exits, and entry into new markets? In this course, students will learn to critically analyze and answer these questions, gaining insights they can leverage in their future roles as innovation industry executives, entrepreneurs, strategist and investors. The course includes three major units. In Unit 1, Patents and Innovation Value, we examine closely the relationship between competitive advantage, value proposition, and intellectual property (particularly patents). We will apply our understanding of that relationship to critique and sharpen patent strategy to protect examples of cutting-edge technologies. In Unit 2, Patent Leverage and the Corporate Playbook, we study theory and examples of how intellectual property leverage strategically informs corporate transactions and decisions, for established companies as well as for start-ups. In unit 3, Limits and Alternatives to Patents, we confront the recent legal trend toward reigning in the power and scope of patents. We also consider the growing importance of data as a proprietary technology asset, and discuss options for adapting intellectual property strategy appropriately. Throughout, students will learn and practice applying the concepts we learn to decision-making in examples based on innovative real-world technologies and businesses.

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