Kelly Kiyeon Lee

Kelly Kiyeon Lee
  • Associate Adjunct Professor & Research Scholar

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    3730 Walnut Street
    500 JMHH
    Philadelphia PA 19104

Overview

Kelly Kiyeon Lee is an Associate Adjunct Professor and Research Scholar of Operations, Information, and Decisions at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

​Professor Lee’s research program focuses on the psychology of decision-making and negotiations. In particular, her work demonstrates how emotions such as anxiety and gratitude can influence economic and ethical decisions in negotiations. In her other work, she explores how price information, construal level theory, and hedonic experiences influence decisions.

Building on her research focus on judgment and decision-making, Professor Lee’s teaching concentrates on judgment and decision-making at different levels of analysis (i.e. individuals, dyads, and groups). She has successfully taught Negotiations, Principles of Marketing, and Consumer Behavior.

Professor Lee earned her Ph.D. in Marketing from the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto and completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis. She has been on the faculty at Oklahoma State University and Georgetown University.

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Research

Kelly Kiyeon Lee’s research investigates psychology of decision-making and negotiations.

Specifically, her research investigates emotions, biases, and ethics.

  • Jeremy Yip and Kelly Lee (2022), Emotions and ethics: How emotions sensitize perceptions of the consequences for self and others to motivate unethical behavior, Current Opinion in Psychology, 48 (101464). Abstract

    In this work, we suggest that emotions differentiated by cognitive appraisals may promote self-concern or other-concern that alter the utilitarian calculus of weighing the harm and benefits associated with moral decision-making. We introduce the Emotions and Ethics Framework to elucidate the intrapsychic effect of emotion on deception. When emotions promote self-concern, individuals are more likely engage in selfish deception. By contrast, when emotions promote other-concern, individuals are more likely to exhibit honesty. Furthermore, we extrapolate our theoretical model to consider how felt emotions influence different types of deception: selfish lies, prosocial lies, spiteful lies, and pareto lies. Finally, we theorize about the interpersonal effect of emotional expressions on deception, suggesting that the ethical consequences of emotion contagion and reverse–appraisal processes are distinct.

  • Kelly Lee and Min Zhao (2014), The Effect of Price on Preference Consistency Over Time, Journal of Consumer Research, 41 (), pp. 109-118. Abstract

    Construal level theory indicates that consumers tend to prefer products high in desirability (greater functionality) for distant-future decisions but switch their preferences toward products high in feasibility (greater usage convenience) for near-future decisions. The current research demonstrates that price information, traditionally considered as a feasibility cue, can increase consumers’ near-future preference toward products with greater functionality despite their low convenience, leading to preference consistency over time. As the underlying mechanism, price information increases the functionality importance for near-future decisions due to consumers’ enhanced value-seeking tendency when seeing price and their lay belief that greater functionality represents higher value. Further, when consumers are led to believe that greater convenience represents higher value, price and the value-seeking tendency result in a greater preference toward easy-to-use products for the distant future and lead to preference consistency across time as well. Theoretical implications are discussed.

Teaching

Past Courses

  • LGST2910 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills.

  • MGMT2910 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills.

  • OIDD2910 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills.

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