Lauren Eskreis-Winkler

Lauren Eskreis-Winkler

Contact Information

Research Interests: motivation, intervention, learning, failure, grit, resilience

Links: CV, Personal Website

Overview

Lauren Eskreis-Winkler earned her PhD in Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania.

The primary focus of her work is to understand how to motivate people who struggle with goal achievement. With this objective, she has developed and disseminated motivational interventions in the U.S., West Africa, Australia, Macedonia, and the UK.  These interventions aim to motivate individuals across the spectrum – struggling athletes, students in grade school and college, individuals in the workforce, smokers trying to quit smoking, and unemployed individuals on the job market.  Lauren has collaborated with businesses, educational organizations, Minor League Baseball teams, the Macedonian Ministry of Education, and the World Bank.

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Teaching

Past Courses

  • PSYC001 - INTRO TO EXP PSYCH

    This course provides an introduction to the basic topics of psychology including our three major areas of distribution: the biological basis of behavior, the cognitive basis of behavior, and individual and group bases of behavior. Topics include, but are not limited to, neuropsychology, learning, cognition, development, disorder, personality, and social psychology.

Knowledge@Wharton

How an ‘Employees First’ Pandemic Response Pays Off

When the coronavirus pandemic began, PriceSmart CEO Sherry Bahrambeygui reset the company’s culture and found more productive ways to get things done. In a recent conversation with Wharton’s Mike Useem, she shared what she has learned.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2020/06/1
Planning for the Post-COVID-19 Workforce: Four Scenarios

Scenario thinking can help organizations better anticipate and adapt to dramatic changes, increase agility and resilience, and turn uncertainty into advantage, according to the authors of this opinion piece.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2020/06/1
The Problem with Heroes

For any leader, the ongoing presence of heroes is both a cause for celebration and a reason for deep concern, because it indicates a failure of the wider system, writes Wharton’s Gregory P. Shea in this opinion piece.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2020/05/29